Should we stay Isolationist?

Here is a link to the image.

This flowchart represents the views of the Americans during the early 20th century. Until WWII, we were a largely isolationist nation. We didn’t even get involved in an organization we created for fear of being dragged into foreign conflicts. We stayed economically isolated during the twenties because we were very independently stable due to buying on credit and mass production. This continued in the great depression because we didn’t want more debt to other nations. Many immigration quotas were passed because Americans didn’t want unskilled immigrants taking their jobs. People were thrown in jail many times due to their socialistic viewpoints. All of these things contributed to American isolationism. This is why the group of isolationists were so diverse, because no matter what point they took, they always came back to isolationism.

sources:

http://www.andycrown.net/isolation.htm

http://history.state.gov/milestones/1937-1945/american-isolationism

http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/saccov/redscare.html

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2 thoughts on “Should we stay Isolationist?

  1. It is true that the US always stayed isolationist and neutral (or tried to). I think it’s also interesting to look at the how the US always ended up getting involved in world wars. I’ve noticed the US always had a tendency of getting involved in war after 1 specific event. For WWI, it was the resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare. For WWII, it was the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Those two simple events mentioned above were what caused Americans to suddenly all support the wars that began in Europe which just leads you to think how spontaneous and arbitrary the US can be. (almost like a teenager who always jumps into decisions).

  2. I agree with your statement here, and I think it can be extended through to the Iraq War because after 9/11, the US was earnest for justice and jumped into a war that lasted us until 2011. I think this is an important point you’ve brought up and one that we can still learn from today.

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